A Renewed Focus on Institutional Strengthening in Kenya

This post originally appeared on USAID's IMPACT Blog.

Lisa McGregor-Mirghani (right), Local Capacity Team Lead for USAID in Kenya, speaking at the Institutional Strengthening Symposium in Nairobi. Dr. Daraus Bukenya (center) and colleagues also participated on the panel.Photo credit: USAID

Under its 2010 constitution, Kenya’s major reforms include a devolved government in which civil society organizations (CSOs) have an enhanced contribution to strengthening health and social systems. The reforms are timely, as other donor mandates, such as USAID Forward, also place greater emphasis on country-led, country-driven development assistance, with more direct investment in partner governments and local organizations, and stronger public-private partnerships. To achieve these mandates, local capacity must be developed so that these institutions can play their part.

At the invitation of the FANIKISHA Institutional Strengthening Project (FANIKISHA), nearly 200 people gathered in Nairobi June 10-12, 2013, for a three-day symposium on institutional strengthening for Kenya’s civil society organizations. This was the first major forum where donors, civil society, and other health stakeholders in Kenya came together to focus on this topic. Presentations made the case for the importance of strong, local CSOs that can compete with and complement their international counterparts and have sustainable impact on the health and well-being of Kenyans. Bringing together major donor agencies fostered the understanding of complementary activities the international community is supporting and presented new opportunities for networking and partnerships.

Finish reading this post on MSH's Health Impact blog.